"All SNMP Managers Are Not Created Equal - 13 Ways To Choose The Right One..."

T/Mon NOC Pedestals
Selecting the Right SNMP Manager
is serious business...
Read Every One of These 13 Key
Functions...

Did you think carefully when you picked your SNMP manager, or did you just pick the first one you found? Maybe you "inherited" a manager when you changed jobs. Whatever the reason, you're probably not positioned as well as you should be when it comes to SNMP.

Think for a second about how much easier it would be with your SNMP manager working constantly to help you.

This list of 13 Key SNMP Manager Functions teaches you how to select the best possible SNMP manager:

  1. Assign severity to your alarms. The device that you're monitoring might not embed a severity in the trap, or you might not agree with the level they assigned.
  2. Categorize the alarms by types. Also, allow access to those types to be selectively given to authorized people. Too many alarms going into one large pile is never a good thing. Differentiation and selective routing is key when multiple people and/or multiple departments are involved in alarm management.
  3. Maintain history that can be queried by many different criteria so network events can be analyzed after-the-fact.
  4. Have a "strong" notification system. A must for those companies that don't have 7x24 NOCs, strong notifications also comes in handy if you step away from your master screen. A strong notification system must support multiple forms of media, including Alpha Pagers, Numeric Pagers, Cell phones, PDA's, and E-mail. It must also have scheduling that allows you to notify the right person for the right problem at the right time. And, of course, your master's notification system must provide for alarm escalation if required.
  5. Be actively supported by your vendor. When was your last software update?
  6. Support Non-SNMP Devices. Even though we live in an SNMP world, there are still non-SNMP devices in your network. Wouldn't it be good if your system could look at those as well?
  7. Filter Nuisance Alarms. Are there some alarms that you want to ignore between 9 & 5? Alarms that keep toggling after you already dispatched on them? Life's too short for that kind of frustration. An SNMP trap, like any other alarm, might not be relevant. In fact, even alarms you care about at times might be a "nuisance" at other times. You need to be able to turn off alarms you never want to see, either temporarily or permanently.
  8. Forward alarms to a higher-level master. What about forwarding SNMP traps to higher-level managers at Corporate? Not many systems do this, so make sure any system that you consider can do forward alarms as SNMP traps.
  9. Detailed Text Messages for Every Alarm. Does you system have the ability to tell you what you should do when an alarm comes in? If it did, your staff's learning curve and effectiveness would go way up.
  10. System Scalability. Is your system scalable? If you only have one screen on your master, you can't effectively distribute or route your monitoring load. Make sure that multiple people can access the system concurrently. By the way, wouldn't it be great if they could just web browse to the data (secured by SSL encryption)?
  11. Strong Security. You have critical data travelling through your network. Make sure you can control who accesses it and to what extent. Having "all or nothing" access control doesn't cut it these days.
  12. Derived Alarms and Controls. It's nice to see SNMP alarms on the screen, but what about the alarms that don't directly come from SNMP devices? Make sure you have a system that is capable of continuously looking for combinations of events that indicate critical problems... and make sure it can notify you swiftly and automatically.
  13. Graphical Alarm Presentation SNMP alarms, by definition, are text-based. However, you must make sure you system presents those alarms in a meaningful way. Graphical screens allow you to assign geographical hierarchy to you network so you get an intuitive view of your system that allows you to manage your network more effectively. The old axiom "a picture is worth a thousand words" applies to SNMP as much as it does to anything else.

Learn more about selecting a top-quality SNMP manager on the T/Mon LNX Product Page, then

Call the DPS SNMP Manager Experts today at 1-800-693-0351.


Mediate Alarms To Your Alcatel-Lucent 5620 Service Aware Manager...
Alarm remotes (RTUs) compatible with Megasys Telenium masters

SNMPC Manager: Forward Alarms & Gain Dense Discrete Alarm Coverage...

Gain Dense Discrete Alarm Point Coverage and Forward Alarms To Your SNMPC Manager...
Gain Dense Discrete Alarm Point Coverage and Forward Alarms To Your SNMPC Manager...

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

This application provides a convenient way of alarm notification to your current SNMPc Manager. The NetGuardian 480 (NG480) is a specialized member of the NetGuardian family, optimized for use as a high-capacity discrete-only responder. The result is a highly costeffective solution for gathering the diverse equipment at your remote site and integrating it into a single modern network management system. With 80 discrete alarm inputs - two and a half times as many as the NetGuardian 832A - you can easily forward all the alarms of a small to medium-sized site to your SNMPc Manager. This dense alarm coverage gives you the convenience of a single-box solution, saves you the cost of buying multiple low-capacity RTUs, and offers you the lowest possible cost per point. Take advantage of the NetGuardian 480's ease of use.

Configuring SNMP traps to report to your SNMPC Manager's IP addresses is simple and quick using the included Windows-based T/NG480 utility. T/NG480 also provides a single, uniform interface for all of the NG 480's functions. Field technicians can provision alarms, view the status of alarm points, turn control relays on and off, analyze communication traffic between the NG 480 and its alarm collection master, and load firmware upgrades by merely plugging a PC into the craft port on the NG 480's front panel. Once the site has been turned up, the network administrator can use T/NG480 over LAN to monitor alarms or change the configuration of the unit.


SNMPc SNMP Manager Monitoring NetGuardian Remotes

SNMPc SNMP Manager Monitoring NetGuardian Remotes
SNMPc SNMP Manager Monitoring NetGuardian Remotes

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

This solution features NetGuardian 832A's along with 19" Wire Wrap Back Panels. The NetGuardian will be the perfect solution to monitoring your discrete and analog alarms and sending those alarms via SNMP over IP to your SNMPc Manager.

The Hinged Wire Wrap Back Plane will attach behind the NetGuardian832A to facilitate alarm termination. The back panel hinges open for easy access to the data (serial) ports, LAN, phone and power connections of the NetGuardian. The back plane consists of two wire-wrap fields that allow convenient termination access to the discrete alarms and controls. The analog inputs have a special header that plugs directly into the NetGuardian 832A's analog inputs. This is ideal for uses where rack space is a premium. The Hinged Wire Wrap Back Plane will mount to the rear side of a relay rack.

The 1 RU NetGuardian 832A alarm remote supports 32 discrete alarms, 8 analog inputs, 8 control relays, 7 serial ports, 1 RS485 port and an informative local LCD display all in a 1 rack unit of space.


Intermapper And Castle Rock SNMP Managers Can Monitor NetGuardians

Intermapper and Castle Rock SNMP Managers can Monitor NetGuardians
Intermapper and Castle Rock SNMP Managers can Monitor NetGuardians
Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

This solution contains eight (8) NetGuardian 480s, eight (8) 110V (wall) to -48V Converters, and seven (7) Discrete TempAlert Sensors.

The NetGuardians can be monitored with your deployed SNMP Manager, including Intermapper or Castle Rock.

With 80 discrete alarm inputs - two and a half times as many as the NetGuardian 832A - you can easily forward all the alarms of a small to medium-sized site to your CastleRock and/or InterMapper SNMP manager(s). This dense alarm coverage gives you the convenience of a single-box solution, saves you the cost of buying multiple low-capacity RTUs, and offers you the lowest possible cost per point. You can take advantage of the NetGuardian 480 ease of use. Configuring SNMP traps to report to both SNMP manager IP addresses is simple and quick using the included Windows-based T/NG480 utility. T/NG480 also provides a single, uniform interface for all of the NG 480's functions.

The TempAlert Sensor is a discrete temperature sensor with high and low alarms thresholds. This unit has separate alarms for high and low temperatures. Temperature range from 30 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit (-1.1 to 37.8 degree Celsius). It requires no power to operate. Wall mount rectangular box designed. The unit includes screw kit for mounting hardware.



Megasys SNMP Manager Monitoring A NetGuardian 216

APC InfrastruXure SNMP Manager monitoring the NetGuardian 216
APC InfrastruXure SNMP Manager monitoring the NetGuardian 216

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

Recognizing your need to monitor your smaller sites and have those critical alarms report to your MegaSys SNMP Manager, we have provided a solution for a single NetGuardian 216.

The advantage of the NetGuardian 216 is that it features 2 Analog type of alarms that can be used for Battery Plant Monitoring and/or Temperature. In addition, it features a RS232 Serial Reach Through Port and will be able to act as a mini-terminal server.

We believe that the NetGuardian 216 will be the perfect match for your monitoring needs.

NetGuardian 216 with RS232

The -48 VDC NetGuardian 216 offers an easy, cost-effective way to monitor your small sites. The NetGuardian 216 comes equipped with 16 discrete alarm inputs, 2 analog alarm inputs, and 2 control relay outputs. The discrete alarms are items such as door alarms, equipment alarms and other ON/OFF events. The discrete alarms are "software reversible" to support both N/O and N/C alarm wiring. The NetGuardian 216's 2 analog inputs can be used for measuring such critical events as temperature, voltage and battery. We also have a line of sensors, which can be used with the NetGuardian 216 and can be included upon your request.



Monitor Lucent DDM2000 And SNMP Gear Over IP With T/Mon

Monitor Lucent DDM2000 and SNMP Gear over IP with T/Mon
Monitor Lucent DDM2000 and SNMP Gear over IP with T/Mon

Equipment Used

How This Application Works:

The T/Mon Master Station will provide the central aggregation point for both your telecom and IT Networks. It can provide specific alarm viewing and reporting to technicians on either side of the network.

T/Mon will monitor SNMP devices over LAN. It will also monitor your Lucent DDM2000. Monitoring for the DDM2000 begins across RS232 serial to a NetGuardian remote at the site. Data is then forwarded as ASCII text across your LAN to T/Mon for alarm processing.

The Auto data-basing ASCII software will allow you to create rules to parse the ASCII output and capture the key data, then present the alarm then perform paging and email notification. This software greatly enhances the overall functionality of the T/MON NOC system and provides you with a single, consolidated alarm management system.



Nagios Manager Collecting Alarms Via SNMP Over LAN From A NetDog G2...

Nagios Manager Collecting Alarms via SNMP over LAN from a NetDog G2
Nagios Manager Collecting Alarms via SNMP over LAN from a NetDog G2

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

This application features three (3) NetDog 82IP's to monitor your alarm points, one for each site. The NetDog 82IP comes equipped with a built-in web browser, which will allow you to database the unit without a Windows-based software utility. It can also report alarms via SNMP over LAN to your Nagios SNMP master station The new NetDog 82IP (G2) has a capacity of 8 discrete inputs, and 2 control relays. The NetDog 82IP's 8 discrete alarm inputs can accept any contact closure type of event, such as door switches, fuse alarms, major and minor equipment alarms, high temperature alarms and tower light monitors.

The 2 control relay outputs can be used for a number of functions including operating standby equipment, door locks or emergency lighting. The NetDog 82IP's built in 33.6 modem will not only dial to a pager directly to report a fault or alarm, but once alerted, the staff can dial into the NetDog 82IP using the telnet session and control up to 2 different pieces of equipment i.e. back up generator, turning lights on etc.

The NetDog 82IP is easy to install, with connectors for all ports and captive screw-lug terminals for alarm and control wiring. The unit mounts on any vertical flat surface, or it can be desktop mounted. If needed, we also carry mounting panels for equipment rack mounting.

Alarms are reported to your Nagios SNMP manager for collection and presentation to your operators.


Nagios Manager: Report Alarms Via SNMP With The NetDog 82IP G2...

The NetDog Reporting Alarms via SNMP To Your Nagios Manager...
The NetDog Reporting Alarms via SNMP To Your Nagios Manager...

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

The NetDog 82IP G2 can report alarms via SNMP over LAN to your Nagios master station. The NetDog 82IP can also ping up to 32 network elements which will notify you if critical network elements are not reachable. If an element fails to respond to successive pings, or if something is amiss with the environmental controls, the NetDog 82IP notifies personnel using a variety of methods with a complete status message, including sending an SNMP trap over IP to your Nagios Manager and/or a text message to your pager.

The new NetDog 82IP (G2) has a capacity of 8 discrete inputs, and 2 control relays. The NetDog 82IP's 8 discrete alarm inputs can accept any contact closure type of event, such as door switches, fuse alarms, major and minor equipment alarms, high temperature alarms and tower light monitors.

The 2 control relay outputs can be used for a number of functions including operating standby equipment, door locks or emergency lighting. The NetDog 82IP's built in 33.6 modem will not only dial to a pager directly to report a fault or alarm, but once alerted, the staff can dial into the NetDog 82IP using the telnet session and control up to 2 different pieces of equipment i.e. back up generator, turning lights on etc.



NetCool Can Collect SNMP Traps From NetGuardians Over Dial-Up PPP

NetCool can Collect SNMP Traps from NetGuardians over Dial-Up PPP
NetCool can Collect SNMP Traps from NetGuardians over Dial-Up PPP

Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

You need a monitoring solution that will be able to dial out to your NetCool master station. That's why the NetGuardian G4-C, a scaled-down version of the NetGuardian 832A G4, is the sconomical choice for your remote sites.

These NetGuardian G4-C's will differ from full NetGuardian G2's. Please note that the full-featured versions of the NetGuardian G2 comes with a onboard 12V sensor power supply, the NetGuardian G4-C's will not.

The NetGuardian G4-C will come equipped with 16 discretes, 2 analogs with 2 controls. This configuration will give you enough alarm points to monitor HVAC (high & low), rectifier, AC, generator, BAS systems, etc.

Its built-in modem will be able to dial out to NetCool using PPP functionality. The PPP functionality will be an on-demand method. When an alarm occurs, PPP will establish internet connection and the SNMP trap is sent. The NetGuardian G4-C will then terminate the connection after completely sending the SNMP trap.

For more information on this application, call us at 1-800-693-0351 to schedule an online Web Presentation. By simply visiting our website and calling our bridge number we can provide a PowerPoint presentation on the NetGuardian G4-C for you and your entire team. This is a quick and efficient use of your time and provides the quickest way of getting everyone 'up-to-speed'.

Monitor SNMP-based SONET gear with T/Mon NOC
Monitor SNMP-based SONET gear with T/Mon NOC
Equipment Used:

How This Application Works:

We are pleased to present a monitoring solution that will provide you with a means of monitoring NetGuardians and other SNMP-based SONET equipment. As you will see in this application drawing, this solution addresses your vital concerns, including providing redundancy, eliminating multiple obsolete platforms, and increasing your monitoring reliability.

The SNMP Trap Processor Software Module will give your T/Mon Master Station the ability to receive SNMP traps from network elements and convert them to standardized T/Mon alarms so you will be able to view them. This will result in a very powerful SNMP manager because not only will your T/Mon be able to accept DCPx from DPS remotes, you will be able to monitor your other SNMP devices as well. This software module will support V1 as well as V2 devices and is very simple to use. Simply compile the MIB onto the T/Mon Master Station, select the rules for how you want to see those alarms and you've integrated those into the system.

We would also like to invite you to visit DPS Telecom for factory training. The factory-training course is tightly focused on your specific, real-world monitoring tasks. We've added more material on the applications you most want to know about - like ASCII alarm processing [SNMP protocol], creating a curriculum built around the product features, monitoring technologies and network management techniques that you use the most.