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Chapter 5: How You Can Migrate Your Remote Sites to LAN Without Killing Your Budget

Installing LAN connections at remote sites is a significant cost - it can be the single biggest expense of your SNMP implementation. Many remote sites are distant and isolated, making them difficult to be integrated into your corporate network.

Fortunately, you don't need a LAN connection at every remote site. SNMP data can also travel over an alternative transport, like PPP over a dial-up connection or dedicated line.

That's a good immediate solution, but in the long run you'll still want to move as many sites as possible to LAN. Compared to dial-up and dedicated lines, LAN is faster, more reliable - and most importantly, doesn't require repeating monthly costs.

So now you face a dilemma: avoiding the repeating high costs of a dedicated line means taking on the immediate and enormous costs of installing LAN at your remote sites.

How can you get through this dilemma? The answer is controlled migration to LAN transport.

How LAN Migration Works - Step One: Install an SNMP RTU with Dial-Up or Dedicated Line Capability

In a controlled LAN migration strategy, you first integrate your remote sites into your SNMP-based monitoring system, using existing transport.

To do this, all you need is an SNMP-based remote telemetry unit (RTU) or proxy device that supports both LAN transport and your existing transport.

A dial-up connection and a PPP server can connect your most distant remote sites to your LAN.
Figure 1. A dial-up connection and a PPP server can connect your most distant remote sites to your LAN.

In this diagram, a site that is originally monitored by a legacy RTU via a dial-up connection is replaced by an SNMP RTU that has both LAN and dial-up capability (Figure 1).

Alarm data is collected by the RTU, reported via dial-up to a PPP server which connects to the SNMP manager.