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Humidity Sensor Alarm System for Remote Monitoring

Humidity and Electronics: A Bad Fit

Weather fluctuations can make humidity levels highly unstable. That's why monitoring the humidity of your facilities is necessary for maintaining network stability and preventing equipment failures.

In warmer temperatures, the humidity increases as the air is able to hold more moisture. This high humidity range means that moisture can permeate into hardware systems and then condense in certain conditions. This can short-circuit expensive electronic components or at least create spurious unexpected connections.

On the other hand, low humidity can dry-out seals and other protective elements. It can also increase the chances of static electricity discharge with possibly catastrophic effect on sensitive electronic circuits.

These issues can create substantial repair or replacement costs if humidity is not monitored and controlled. On the other hand, the issues can be reduced or completely removed by careful remote environmental monitoring and control using humidity sensors.


Temperature and humidity sensor

Temp/Humidity Sensor.

Humidity Sensor Basics

A humidity sensor is a device used for providing ongoing measurements of the air's relative humidity. This works by running an electrical current between two nodes and then monitoring the amount of voltage created by the air's moisture. In telecom, humidity sensors are important for remote monitoring and control for humidity levels and ensuring the safety of your electronic infrastructure.

Purchasing a quality humidity detector sensor will quickly improve the safety of your telecom network. Depending on the needs of your business, humidity sensors come in a wide range of sensors products from different shapes and sizes. They can be large or small, internal or external, and stand-alone or daisy-chained. Some sensors have external probes for reaching specific locations, where others are contained inside small boxes for ambient monitoring.

When selecting a humidity sensor, be sure to look for sensors that can adapt to your environment. They also need to provide you with reliable and easy ways to monitor your infrastructure.


How Do Humidity Sensors Work: Analog or Digital Output

Humidity (and temperature) sensors are a fundamental part of your network monitoring system. And they're typically monitored constantly by a remote telemetry unit (RTU). The collected data is processed locally by 'intelligent' RTUs for thresholding and notification, forwarded to Alarm Master Systems for similar processing or both. Humidity sensors measure and report moisture levels in two distinct ways - analog or digital (aka discrete).

Digital sensors are able to monitor conditions for operation within a specified range. When the conditions pass outside the monitored range, the sensor closes a contact (asserts a signal). When the conditions return inside the monitored range, the sensor opens the contact (clears the signal). An RTU reports the digital humidity signal as a binary (0/1; on/off; open/close; hi/lo) type of input.

Analog sensors are more advanced and provide continuous visibility to current conditions through accurate measurements. If you integrate your analog sensor with a good RTU, you can view the monitored value anywhere in in real time.

Quality RTUs can process the collected data locally against multiple threshold values. They can also generate a binary signal when a threshold is crossed. The most advanced RTUs even provide email, text, and voice call notifications to alert you of emergency situations. This allows you set the change the notification type of an alarm based on its severity.

Not only should an RTU report the generated binary signal, but also the monitored humidity sensor analog output value to the Master Alarm System. In larger systems, it is sometimes easier to administer analog thresholding at a centralized master rather than distributed to each remote throughout the system.

In addition, watch out for large manufacturers who use cheap plastic cases and fail to individually test each of their products. When choosing an RTU, quality is much more important than quantity. The RTU is the brain of your humidity sensor so it's important that it's reliable and efficient.


A Humidity Sensor Monitoring System Example

Imagine you want to monitor network infrastructure that is located on a distant mountaintop. If you were using the NetGuardian 216, your analog humidity sensor could constantly provide you with the exact percentage of humidity at that mountaintop.

With an RTU like the NetGuardian, analog sensors can perform the same process as a temperature and humidity sensor digital output could. At 50% humidity, you could program your NetGuardian to send a minor alert to your email address. At 65% you could choose to send a critical alert directly to your cell phone, keeping you immediately updated on all emergencies at your site.

Some RTUs, like the NetGuardian, have up to 4 thresholds per analog input.

The humidity monitoring sensor can also be integrated into a wider range of site monitoring in a single RTU. Temperature and humidity sensors can be combined. You can also combine your humidity sensor with smoke detectors, climate controls, fuel level senders, floor water sensors and more.

So, it makes obvious sense that you want to have all your sensors monitored by the same remote telemetry unit. This way you'll get a complete picture of your site environment.

A good example of an RTU with a somewhat larger capacity would be the Netguardian 832A G5 from DPS Telecom. With the capacity for 32 discrete alarms and 8 analog inputs, the NetGuardian is clearly engineered for larger, fully integrated site monitoring.

Because there are so many different types of RTUs, choosing the right product can be difficult. It's important to look for RTUs that will work with your current situation. But, also, don't forget to provide functionality for your long-term goals. Try to find an RTU that is a perfect mesh of integration, easy-to-read interface, and size.


Humidity Level Monitoring Protects Your Business

With increasing global temperatures and unexpected weather fluctuations, humidity monitoring is becoming increasingly relevant. If you operate a business that uses electronic devices, humidity could pose a significant risk to your network's safety. Being informed on humidity readings and on the condition of your infrastructure, you can feel confident with your temperature and humidity monitoring system's security. Then, you can begin focusing on other challenges of growing your business.

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