Generators are a critical part of any robust telecom network design. They are typically third rung in the power later. Commercial power is the primary source for normal operation, followed by your battery plant for short to medium term protection and generators for longer term operation without the primary commercial power.

Generators come in all sizes, shapes, power outputs, but they also vary widely with respect to the technology they use to report alarms. Older generation equipment as well as basic models use relays to generate contact closures to report alarms. These types of generators require an RTU (such as the DPS NetGuardian 832A) to collect these contact closure, to report them back to an SNMP alarm master or make them viewable from a web browser. Newer equipment use higher level protocols, typically SNMP to provide more detailed status and alarm information. These alarms could report to your existing SNMP alarm master or a DPS T/Mon NOC. Newer generators may also come with their own administration / management tool. If it does, from a best practices point of view, you should consider this as an element manager layer. As such you should still have alarms forwarded to your NOC or MOM so you have generator visibility as part of your overall network view.


Other information you may find helpful regarding generator monitoring:


Client Best Practices: Using Derived Alarms for Generator Monitoring
Monitor Generator, Battery, Intrusion, and Low Fuel Alarms
"Set Up 'Low Fuel' Alerts with NetGuardian Accumulation Timers..."
Use MODBUS to Monitor Your Generator Output, Fuel, & Status
Monitor Your Generator and Building Alarms With the NetDog 82IP G2...
Propane Monitoring
Remote Monitor and Control Your Remote Site Propane Tanks Using a TempDefender
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